walk with the orchids

The beautiful orchids that are listed here are featured in our unique Shangri-La Hotel, Singapore self-guided orchid walking tour. The journey of discovery takes place in our gardens; guided by a map, we hope our guests enjoy this one-of-a-kind orchid experience.
  • 1. Dendrobium By Shangri-La Singapore
    This is a hybrid of D. Palolo Sunshine – named after the golden sunsets of the Palolo Valley in Oahu, Hawaii – and D. Pink Spider, a locally created cross. Registered in 2006 it comes from a rich lineage spread over several generations, and which can be traced to very attractive free-flowering ancestors such as D. May Neal and D. Liholiho as well as hardy species such as D. phalaenopsis, D. lineale and D. discolor. Most if not all of them are native to Papua New Guinea, Queensland, Australia and eastern Indonesia. Because of their outstanding habits, many of these dendrobiums have been used as parents for VIP hybrids. In floral form, the ancestors vary greatly from round to twisted petals and sepals, with a predominance of yellow, white and light orange/brown colours.
    DENDROBIUM SHANGRI-LA

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  • 2. Dendrobium Joyce Margaret Kuok
    A cross between D. Pink Power and D. Mah Bow Tan, the deep reds, robust form and well-arranged flowers on each spike are inherited from D. lasianthera, a vigorous grower and very fertile ancestor giving rise to an untold number of successful progeny. D. Margaret Joyce Kuok is a fine example of an ‘antelope’ orchid which originates from Papua New Guinea. Amongst the antelope traits are long-lasting flowers and a floriferous habit, where several spikes can bloom simultaneously. Flowers can number as many as 50, spirally arranged, on a spray.
    DENDROBIUM JOYCE MARGARET KUOK

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  • 3. Vanda Miss Joaquim*
    Vanda Miss Joaquim was selected as Singapore’s National Flower in 1981. The orchid first appeared in the garden of Agnes Joaquim (1854-1899), an Armenian lady who had won prizes in garden shows of the day, and who brought the flower to then Director of the Botanic Gardens, Henry Ridley, for identification. Ridley declared the flower a hybrid of Vanda hookeriana and Vanda teres, and registered it as Vanda Miss Joaquim in her honour, in 1893. It was to be the very first Vanda to be registered in the world, and the very first hybrid registered from Singapore. Interestingly, the Hawaiians became one of the most successful growers of Vanda Miss Joaquim, with flowers mainly made into leis (garlands).
    * Now more correctly known as Papilionanthe Miss Joaquim.
    VANDA MISS JOAQIUM

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  • 4. Dendrobium leporinum
    This ‘rabbit ear’ dendrobium is typically found in the Moluccas and western New Guinea, deriving its name from the Latin ‘leporinus’ meaning ‘of the hare’, doubtless due to the highly striking and almost vertical twisted petals. The inflorescence is generally erect, and the shiny yellow-green stems are cane-like and relatively small compared to the size of the flowers. Whilst only a handful of this species – including an alba form – has been used for breeding, the resulting delicate flowers are rather unique and pleasing.
    DENDROBIUM LEPORINUM

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  • 5. Dendrobium bigibbum
    The inflorescences of this highly variable species can carry up to 20 well-arranged flowers which possess many colour variations ranging from dark purple to pastels and white. Endemic to Queensland Australia and Papua New Guinea, D. biggibum belongs to the section Phalaenanthe, and has been a prolific seed parent to 83 crosses and pollen parent to an astounding 203 crosses registered to date. Belonging to the miniature class of Dendrobium hybrids, they are hardy, mostly free flowering and make excellent landscape plants.
    DENDROBIUM BIGIBBUM

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  • 6. Dendrobium antennatum
    Found in Queensland, Australia, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, this species is similar to Dendrobium leporinum in habit and form, though not so much in colour. The lip structure is also quite different. Again, it is distinguished by a striking pair of twisted, vertical petals, earning its sobriquet ‘antelope’. To date 25 crosses have been made with D. antennatum as seed parent, and 55 as pollen parent. The plant grows well on tree stumps.
    DENDROBIUM ANTENATUM

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  • 7. Arundina graminifolia
    Also known as the bamboo orchid, this terrestrial species is one of many orchids native to Singapore though it is also extensively found in tropical Asia and the Pacific islands. It is sometimes spotted growing in clumps in secluded parts of the Republic’s water catchment areas. Recent breeding done with the only other known species Ar. caespitosa has resulted in very promising hybrids of a delightful ‘blue’ colour, and we look forward to more public parks being landscaped with these delightful purplish pink orchids which bloom year round.
    ARUNDINA GRAMINIFOLIA

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  • 8. Brassavola Lady of the Night
    A cross between B. subulifolia and B. grandiflora, this Central and South American primary hybrid flowers freely in our tropical lowlands climate. The flowers are relatively long lasting and their exquisite fragrance, which is stronger in the evenings, attracts a particular nocturnal moth. The genus was named in honour of a Venetian nobleman and physician Antonio Musa Brassavola in the early 19th century.
    BRASSAVOLA LADY OF THE NIGHT

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  • 9. Brassolaelia Yellow Bird
    A hybrid of Brassocattleya Richard Mueller and Brassavola nodosa, this floriferous cross is also scented at night, and has inherited many of the traits of B. nodosa from both parents. (Bc. Richard Mueller itself is a cross between B. nodosa and Cattleya milleri). The multiple flowers’ predominant yellow colour and star-shaped sunny temperament surely light up the dark spots of green in any garden.
     BRASSOLAELIA YELLOW BIRD

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  • 10. Bulbophyllum grandiflorum
    Bulbophyllum comprises the orchid world’s most extensive genus, with over 1200 known species, though in South East Asia there are only about 500 species. Native to Sumatra, Sulawesi, the Maluku islands and Papua New Guinea, B. grandiflorum is a spectacular epiphyte that can be found in elevations ranging from 100 to 800m. The flowers of B. grandiflorum measure as much as 15cm in length.
    10. Bulbo-
    phyllum grandi-
    florum

    Bulbophyllum comprises the orchid world’s most extensive genus, with over 1200 known species, though in South East Asia there are only about 500 species. Native to Sumatra, Sulawesi, the Maluku islands and Papua New Guinea, B. grandiflorum is a spectacular epiphyte that can be found in elevations ranging from 100 to 800m. The flowers of B. grandiflorum measure as much as 15cm in length.
    BULBOPHYLLUM GRANDIFLORUM

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  • 11. Cymbidium finlaysonianum
    This species is found throughout lowland South East Asia and as far east as the Maluku islands, and is characterized by hard leathery leaves and spikes up to 90cm long which hang in pendulous formation. The small flowers are fruit-scented and when the multiple sprays are in full flower the whole plant presents an attractive display. Because it is fairly drought tolerant, many of Singapore’s roadside raintrees have been planted with C. finlaysonianum as part of the island’s orchid re-introduction programme.
    Cymbidium finlaysonianum

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  • 12. Grammatophyllum speciosum
    Commonly known as the tiger orchid, it is also the world’s largest and heaviest orchid plant, with a circumference the size of a small room. Too large to cultivate in a pot, it can only be grown in a tree fork or on the ground. When in full flower, the plant is nothing short of spectacular, and can produce as many as 1,000 flowers on 38 blooming spikes! In fact, a very healthy G. speciosum with these vital statistics won the Grand Champion Plant of Show at the 2014 Singapore Orchid Show. Unfortunately this species flower infrequently, perhaps once in every 3 to 4 years.
    12. Grammato-
    phyllum speciosum

    Commonly known as the tiger orchid, it is also the world’s largest and heaviest orchid plant, with a circumference the size of a small room. Too large to cultivate in a pot, it can only be grown in a tree fork or on the ground. When in full flower, the plant is nothing short of spectacular, and can produce as many as 1,000 flowers on 38 blooming spikes! In fact, a very healthy G. speciosum with these vital statistics won the Grand Champion Plant of Show at the 2014 Singapore Orchid Show. Unfortunately this species flower infrequently, perhaps once in every 3 to 4 years.
    GRAMMATOPHYLLUM SPECIOSUM

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  • 13. Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi
    This species is also known in Borneo as the crocodile tail orchid and in the wilds is found in bright spots in riverine and swamp forests. It often has several inflorescences with star-shaped long-lasting flowers, and a distinctive banding or blotchy patterned colouring ranging from cinnamon-red to yellow and pale green, on a light greenish yellow background. It is a prolific parent of at least 98 registered crosses, and ancestor to many hundreds more.
    PHALAENOPSIS CORNU CERVI

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  • 14. Rhynchostylis Mary Motes
    A primary cross between Rhy. coelestis and Rhy. retusa, this hybrid was created in 1989 by Martin Motes, a world renowned figure in vandaceous breeding. The seed parent Rhy. coelestis has violet and white flowers on upright spikes and is endemic to Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. Known as the foxtail orchid, Rhy. retusa is credited with medicinal properties and when in full bloom the spectacular plant yields over 100 tightly arranged pink-spotted white flowers on pendulous spikes. The species is located in a wide region covering the Asian subcontinent including Nepal, Bangladesh, India and parts of Indonesia, Malaysia, China and the Philippines.
    RHY COELESTIS X RETUSA

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  • 15. Renanthera Kalsom
    This fire-cracker red orchid is a primary hybrid between Ren. philippinensis and Ren. storiei, both found in a relatively small region in north Philippines. The hybrid is floriferous and hardy, and has a branching habit, which makes it a perennial favourite of local landscapists. Ren. Kalsom has been mericloned in their thousands for pot plant sales, especially during Chinese New Year, since the red colour is a mark of happiness and prosperity.
    RENANTHERA KALSOM

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  • 16. Vanda lamellata x (V. denisoniana x V. merrillii)
    This hybrid is a progeny of three very popular Vanda species. Originating from northern Philippines, Vanda lamellata is lightly fragrant, with relatively longer inflorescences and small flowers that are more star-shaped. The flowers of Vanda denisoniana, endemic to a wide swath of northern Indochina, have a strong vanilla scent and are often yelloworange in colour. Vanda merrillii is found in northern Philippines where it grows on forest tree branches and possesses wine-red waxy flowers, making it a favourite with growers.
    VANDA LAMELLATA-x

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  • 17. Vanda Mimi Palmer
    A cross between V. Tan Chay Yan and V. tessellata, this hybrid was bred in 1963 by a local nursery. It is floriferous, strongly fragrant and immediately recognizable, as it represents a breakthrough in Vanda breeding where the total flower has strong tessellations. Popular with hobbyists, V. Mimi Palmer is also commonly grown today as a landscape plant and is fully deserving of its Singapore Heritage Orchid status.
    VANDA MIMI PALMER

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  • 18. Vandachostylis Veeraphol
    From its seed parent Vanda Bangkhuntian Gold the cross has inherited the desirable flat-petal shape and rich yellow-gold colours with faint brown spottings, whilst its pollen parent Rhynchostylis gigantea has contributed to the progeny’s floriferousness and floral cluster characteristics, albeit on upright spikes. Made in Thailand, the semi-miniature cross is freeflowering and flowers long-lasting, and is popular with breeders and hobbyists alike.
    VANDA VEERAPHOL

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  • 19. Vanda Pure’s Wax
    Known for its multiple well-arranged flowers on a spike, this hybrid is a cross between Vanda Doctor Anek and V. Kasem’s Delight, both very famous Vanda hybrids which have won awards in orchid shows. V. Pure’s Wax exhibits the desirable flat petal traits of such vandas and some variations possess the intense blue that is associated with the two parents’ ancestry. Warm growing vandas are endemic to South East Asia and parts of the Indian sub-continent.
    VANDA PURE'S WAX

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  • 20. Vanda miniata
    This popular miniature species, originally known as Ascocentrum miniatum, is endemic to a large part of South East Asia, including Sumatra, Java and Malaysia although its exact distribution is unclear. The epiphyte thrives on tree trunks under sunny conditions. The plant is in the habit of forming clumps 30 cm tall with close-set thick leaves, and typically produces several inflorescences each time, thus making it a very spectacular orchid.
    VANDA MINIATUM

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  • 21. Vanda (tessellata x merrillii)
    This hybrid is a progeny of two very famous vandas – V. tessellata, which is free-flowering, has a distinct fragrance and originates from Sri Lanka, Nepal and Myanmar; and V. merrillii, found in the Philippines and Borneo, and known for its glossy, lacquered sheen and strong spicy fragrance. The resultant cross bears faint tessellation markings inherited from its seed parent. It is believed that this is a medicinal plant where its roots are used to treat ailments such as bronchitis, hiccups and inflammation.
    VANDA TESSELLATA MERRILLII

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  • 22. Ionopsis utricularioides
    Known as the ‘delicate violet orchid’ and sometimes the ‘Sakura’ orchid, this species, a synonym for Ionopsis paniculata is a native to central America and the warmer regions of South America. For a small plant, the branching sprays of pink-violet flowers are often showy, and reasonably longlasting. Blooming at least twice a year, it thrives on heat and high humidity, though it also favours Singapore’s highrise balconies, with their drier and airier conditions.
    22. Ionopsis utricul-
    arioides

    Known as the ‘delicate violet orchid’ and sometimes the ‘Sakura’ orchid, this species, a synonym for Ionopsis paniculata is a native to central America and the warmer regions of South America. For a small plant, the branching sprays of pink-violet flowers are often showy, and reasonably longlasting. Blooming at least twice a year, it thrives on heat and high humidity, though it also favours Singapore’s highrise balconies, with their drier and airier conditions.
    IONOPSIS UTRICULARIOIDES

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  • 23. Rhyncholaeliocattleya Greenwich
    Made as early as 1968, this popular cross is known for its unusual star-shaped flowers that bear a clear light apple-green colour, and accented by a bright red lip with yellow throat. Its characteristic firm floral texture, relatively trouble-free flowering habits and long lasting flowers have made it a favourite with growers. Blooms also carry a sweet fragrance.
    23. Rhyncholae-
    liocattleya Greenwich

    Made as early as 1968, this popular cross is known for its unusual star-shaped flowers that bear a clear light apple-green colour, and accented by a bright red lip with yellow throat. Its characteristic firm floral texture, relatively trouble-free flowering habits and long lasting flowers have made it a favourite with growers. Blooms also carry a sweet fragrance.
    RHYNCHOLAELIOCATTLEYA GREENWICH

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  • 24. Vandachostylis Janice Allison
    Previously classified under the genus Vascostylis, this is a hybrid of Vanda Phairots Sand and Rhynchostylis coelestis. The plant exhibits the multiple flower and tight clustering traits of its pollen parent, though its upright spikes and floral size is much bigger and more in line with Vanda breeding. Its distinct coloring, with a dominant magenta red lip, and free flowering nature, not to mention a fresh jasmine fragrance, has made the hybrid a popular plant with hobbyists.
    VASCO JANICE ALLISON

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  • 25. Papilionanda John Clubb
    A cross between Papilionanthe (Vanda) Cooperi and Vanda tessellata, this hybrid has often been mistaken for Papilionanthe (Vanda) Miss Joaquim, which is its grandparent, from the pollen parent. The fact that it has Papilionanthe (Vanda) hookeriana as its ancestor also means inherent qualities such as hardiness and free flowering nature are apparent. The hybrid prefers full sun, and is excellent for landscaping as it is a frequent bloomer and little maintenance is required.
    VANDA JOHN CLUBB

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